Adventures with Psychiatry pt2

So it’s been a few days since I began taking the full 300mg dose of the bupropion. And so far, the patterns that seemed to be emerging before are consistent:

  • Increased irritability. It’s stuck around, but I think I’m starting to get the hang of handling it.
  • Much lower scores on the Burns check list: the highest this week has been a 12, with four different instances of a 9 representing the low. In fact, my weekly average dropped from a 14 to a 10 (technically a 9.8, but close enough).
  • An easier time actually getting going. Four days in a row of paid work (all successfully done) is a good testament to that.

The only difference I have noticed is something I was warned about: if I take the second dose too late, the 6 hour jolt of energy is enough to make it difficult for me to get to sleep. Mostly, this is a problem when I wake up late (ie, 1 or 2pm), rather than the drug acting in some weird way. The other thing I have noticed has been an increase in headaches; but that could simply be attributed to general lack of sleep. In fact, that’s probably what it is; headaches are a fairly common result when I get less than four hours of sleep in a night.

All told, I’m mostly liking the bupropion so far. I’m thinking of doing one more part to this series after a few weeks on the full dose when I’ve gotten a better picture of how it’s affecting me.

Depression is not a Disease but an Indication that Human Consciousness needs to Change

Voces del Tierra

Robin Williams What Dreams May Come-Robin Williams  RIP

After hearing the sad news of Robin Williams and his suspected suicide, I am really tired of hearing some people refer to depression as a ‘disease’. It is not a disease, but more chemical and emotional imbalance of the brain, normally affected by long-term stress, deep trauma or grief, for some it is difficult to diagnose the root cause. Here is a good article written by Dr John Grohol on defining Depression for those of you that are insistent on calling it a ”disease”.

 Furthermore,  should it really be referred to as a ‘mental illness’ either? Through my research and personal experiences, depression is an understandable psychological reaction to the stress and violent deformities of the modern world.

I have tried a number of conventional and non-conventional methods to treat my own depression and I feel the most valuable activities are spending time in…

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